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Nine Pound Hammer – Johnny Cash – Johnny Cash

These country classic song lyrics are the property of the respective nine Pound Hammer – Johnny Cash – Johnny Cash, authors and labels, they are intended solely for educational purposes and private study only. The chords provided are my interpretation and their accuracy is not guaranteed. Nine Pound Hammer lyrics and chords are intended for your personal use, it’s a fun rhythm song by Jimmy Dean.

You find this one to be very entertaining to play and sing, plus it’s easy to do. Type in an artist’s name or song title in the space above for a quick search of Classic Country Music Lyrics website. Copy and paste lyrics and chords to the key changer, select the key you want, then click the button “Click Here”. If the lyrics are in a long line, first paste to Microsoft Word or a similar word processor, then recopy and paste to key changer. Learn this country classic and do it at your next jam session with your buddies, it’s really fun to do.

All the chords are simple to make and it has a fun rhythm. Print Nine Pound Hammer lyrics and chords, practice then surprise your friends. John Henry is an African American folk hero. He is said to have worked as a “steel-driving man”—a man tasked with hammering a steel drill into rock to make holes for explosives to blast the rock in constructing a railroad tunnel. The ornamental plaque celebrates the life of John Henry Talcott, West Virginia.

O Railway line near Talcott, West Virginia. The historical accuracy of many of the aspects of the John Henry legend are subject to debate. Several locations have been put forth for the tunnel on which John Henry died. Johnson, a Professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina, investigated the legend of John Henry in the late 1920s. Some versions of the song refer to the location of John Henry’s death as “The Big Bend Tunnel on the C. Johnson visited the area around 1929 and found several men who said that they were boys of 12 or 14 when the tunnel was begun and that they could remember seeing John Henry, a large, powerful man.

Although most of these men had heard of but not seen the famous contest between John Henry and the steam drill, Johnson ultimately was able to find a man who said he had seen it. This man, known as Neal Miller, told me in plain words how he had come to the tunnel with his father at 17, how he carried water and drills for the steel drivers, how he saw John Henry every day, and, finally, all about the contest between John Henry and the steam drill. When the agent for the steam drill company brought the drill here,” said Mr. Miller, “John Henry wanted to drive against it. He took a lot of pride in his work and he hated to see a machine take the work of men like him.

Well, they decided to hold a test to get an idea of how practical the steam drill was. The test went on all day and part of the next day. He wouldn’t rest enough, and he overdid. He took sick and died soon after that.

Miller described the steam drill in detail. I made a sketch of it and later when I looked up pictures of the early steam drills, I found his description correct. Miller’s reputation, and they all said, “If Neal Miller said anything happened, it happened. Talcott holds a yearly festival named for Henry, and a statue and memorial plaque have been placed along West Virginia Route 3 south of Talcott as it crosses over the Big Bend tunnel. According to Nelson, conditions at the Virginia prison were so terrible that the warden, an idealistic Quaker from Maine, believed the prisoners, many of whom had been arrested on trivial charges, would be better clothed and fed if they were released as laborers to private contractors. He subsequently changed his mind about this and became an opponent of the convict labor system.

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