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Not A Job

47 not A Job 0 0 13 6. Christina Hoff Sommers is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and author of several books, including The War Against Boys.

Much of what we hear about the plight of American women is false. Some faux facts have been repeated so often they are almost beyond the reach of critical analysis. Though they are baseless, these canards have become the foundation of Congressional debates, the inspiration for new legislation and the focus of college programs. 4 percent of world income today. The Brief Newsletter Sign up to receive the top stories you need to know right now. MYTH 2: Between 100,000 and 300,000 girls are pressed into sexual slavery each year in the United States. FACTS: This sensational claim is a favorite of politicians, celebrities and journalists.

Ashton Kutcher and Demi Moore turned it into a cause célèbre. The source for the figure is a 2001 report on child sexual exploitation by University of Pennsylvania sociologists Richard Estes and Neil Alan Weiner. 300,000 estimate referred to children at risk for exploitation—not actual victims. FACTS: This claim has appeared in countless fact sheets, books and articles—for example, in the leading textbook on family violence, Domestic Violence Law, and in the Penguin Atlas of Women in the World. The Penguin Atlas uses the emergency room figure to justify placing the U. Uganda and Haiti for intimate violence.

The Atlas provides no primary source, but the editor of Domestic Violence Law cites a 1997 Justice Department study, as well as a 2009 post on the Centers for Disease Control website. MYTH 4: One in five in college women will be sexually assaulted. FACTS: This incendiary figure is everywhere in the media today. Journalists, senators and even President Obama cite it routinely. Can it be true that the American college campus is one of the most dangerous places on earth for women? The one-in-five figure is based on the Campus Sexual Assault Study, commissioned by the National Institute of Justice and conducted from 2005 to 2007.

In addition, the survey had a large non-response rate, with the clear possibility that those who had been victimized were more apt to have completed the questionnaire, resulting in an inflated prevalence figure. Fox and Moran also point out that the study used an overly broad definition of sexual assault. Defenders of the one-in-five figure will reply that the finding has been replicated by other studies. But these studies suffer from some or all of the same flaws. MYTH 5: Women earn 77 cents for every dollar a man earns—for doing the same work. FACTS: No matter how many times this wage gap claim is decisively refuted by economists, it always comes back. The bottom line: the 23-cent gender pay gap is simply the difference between the average earnings of all men and women working full-time.

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